NAIA terminals l Moneymax

The Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) is Metro Manila’s hub for international and domestic flights. It’s the fifth busiest airport in Asia after Jakarta, Bangkok, Singapore, and Kuala Lumpur. And with the government anticipating the influx of vehicles as it revives the economy,[1] NAIA terminals may again be difficult to reach wherever you’re coming from. 

Each of NAIA’s terminals services different airlines; international carriers (with a few exceptions) mostly fly into Terminal 1, while domestic flights operate out of Terminals 2, 3, and 4. Knowing how to get to each one is a great way to prevent being late for your flight. 

Currently, there are five roads you can use to access NAIA terminals and these are the NAIA Road, Ninoy Aquino Avenue, Andrews Road, Skyway,[2] and Domestic Road. Here’s a look at the 4 NAIA Terminals and how to get there.

NAIA Terminal 1

NAIA terminals - serviced carriers

Terminal 1 is used to exclusively provide international flight services until some carriers moved to NAIA Terminal 3. The terminal facilities include automated teller machines, a smoking area, day rooms, baggage trolleys, baby care facilities, a pharmacy, and a children’s area. 

Available VIP Lounges

Credit cardholders with free access to airport lounges can relax, dine, and unwind at the following before or after their flights:

  • Dusit Thani Manila Hotel Lounge
  • PAGSS Lounge (Observation Level)
  • Club Manila
  • PAGSS Lounge (Gate 7)
  • Japan Airlines Sakura Lounge
  • PAGSS Lounge (Gate 2)

Serviced Carriers

Passengers bound for international flights at NAIA terminals can proceed to Terminal 1 should they need to board: 

  • Air Canada
  • All Nippon Airways – ANA
  • Air China
  • Asiana Airlines
  • Air France
  • AirAsia
  • Air India
  • Bangkok Airways
  • Air Macau
  • Cathay Pacific
  • Air New Zealand
  • Cebgo
  • Air Niugini
  • Cebu Pacific
  • Air Swift
  • China Airlines, China Eastern Airlines, China Southern Airlines
  • Delta Airlines
  • Dragonair
  • Egypt Air
  • El Al Israel Airlines
  • Emirates
  • Etihad Airways
  • EVA Air
  • Garuda Indonesia
  • Hong Kong Airlines (inactive)
  • ITA Airlines (inactive)
  • Gulf Air
  • Japan Airlines
  • Jeju Air
  • Jetstar Airways, Jetstar Asia Airways
  • KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
  • Korean Air
  • Kuwait Airways
  • Malaysia Airlines
  • Oman Air
  • Qantas
  • Qatar Airways
  • Royal Air Philippines
  • Royal Brunei Airlines
  • Saudia
  • Scoot
  • Singapore Airlines
  • Skyjet
  • Starlux Airlines
  • Swiss
  • Thai Airways International
  • Tigerair
  • Turkish Airways
  • United Airlines
  • Vietnam Airlines
  • Xiamen Airlines

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 1 by Car

  1. Go south on EDSA to Pasay, then turn left at the interchange between EDSA and Aurora Boulevard.
  2. From Aurora Boulevard, turn right into Andrews Avenue.
  3. And then from Andrews Avenue, turn left at the intersection of Domestic Road and NAIA Road.
  4. From there, turn right into Ninoy Aquino Avenue and follow the signs leading to NAIA Terminal 1 and Parañaque.

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 1 by Public Transport

Can you commute to NAIA terminals? Yes. The best way to reach NAIA Terminal 1 by public transport is by bus that passes through EDSA. Wherever you’re coming from in Metro Manila, you’ll need to get to EDSA and take a bus that will take you to NAIA Terminal 1. 

For instance, if you’re coming from Mandaluyong, Makati, or Pasig, take the MRT 1 then alight at the EDSA-Taft Station. From there, you can ride a bus to Terminal 1. 

If you’re coming from Quezon City, take the MRT and alight at EDSA-Taft Station, or take the LRT 2 then alight at Araneta Center-Cubao Station. From there, you can take a bus to NAIA Terminal 1. 

Read more: Are You a Commuter? Here’s Your Guide to Every MRT Station

NAIA Terminal 2

NAIA terminals - terminal 2

Terminal 2 operates domestic flights. However, Philippine Airlines, the country’s national flag carrier also operates there. Shaped like a letter V, NAIA Terminal 2 is also known as the Centennial Terminal in commemoration of the 100th year of Philippine Independence.

Available VIP Lounges

The Philippine Airlines Mabuhay Lounge, a non-smoking facility, is located at Terminal 2. 

Serviced Carriers

Terminal 2 is exclusively servicing Philippine Airlines and PAL Express. Effective March 27, 2022,  Philippine Airlines will be using NAIA Terminal 1 for departures to the following destinations:

  • Dammam
  • Dubai
  • Riyadh
  • Toronto
  • Vancouver

The carrier will use Terminal 1 for arrivals from the following:

  • Dammam
  • Dubai
  • Riyadh

On the other hand, PAL will be utilizing Terminal 2 for most of its departures and arrivals[3] to and from:

  • Auckland
  • Bali
  • Bangkok
  • Brisbane
  • Doha
  • Guam
  • Tokyo
  • Hong Kong 
  • Honolulu
  • Jakarta
  • London
  • Los Angeles
  • Macau
  • Melbourne
  • Nagoya
  • New York

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 2 by Car

  1. Go south on EDSA to Pasay, then turn left at the interchange between EDSA and Aurora Boulevard.
  2. From Aurora Boulevard, turn right into Andrews Avenue.
  3. And then from Andrews Avenue, turn left at the intersection of Domestic Road and NAIA Road.
  4. From there, continue past the intersection with Domestic Road until the road forks and follow the signs leading to Terminal 2.

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 2 by Public Transport

Getting to Terminal 2 is practically the same as getting to NAIA Terminal 1. Just board the bus that gets you to these NAIA terminals. 

If you’re coming from Marikina, you can either ride a jeep or take the LRT 2 and then alight at the Araneta Center-Cubao Station. If you’re coming from BGC in Taguig, you can take the Fort Bus and then get off at Ayala. Cross the EDSA – Ayala Pedestrian Overpass and take a bus going to NAIA. 

Read more: Guide to BGC Bus Routes: How to Conveniently Commute to BGC

NAIA Terminal 3

NAIA terminals - terminal 3

Aimed to decongest Terminal 1, NAIA Terminal 3―the largest of all NAIA terminals―was built to accommodate 13 million passengers each year. Terminal 3 is home to 20 boarding gates and some 140 check-in counters. Some facilities which can be found at Terminal 3 include currency exchanges, duty-free stores, phones, help desks, prayer rooms, luggage storage, and lockers. There’s also a medical facility and a children’s area.

Available VIP Lounges

  • PAGSS Lounge
  • Pacific Club
  • Sky View Lounge
  • Wings Transit Lounge
  • Cathay Pacific First and Business Class Lounge
  • Singapore Airlines SilverKris Lounge

Serviced Carriers

Some of the carriers serviced by Terminal 3 include:

  • AirAsia Zest (flights to Kota Kinabalu, Macau, and Seoul)
  • All Nippon Airways
  • Cathay Pacific Airways
  • Cebu Pacific
  • Delta Air Lines
  • Emirates
  • Etihad
  • KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
  • PAL Express (all other flights)
  • Qantas Airways
  • Qatar Airways
  • Turkish Airlines
  • United Airlines
  • Singapore Airlines

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 3 by Car

  1. Go south on EDSA to Pasay, and then exit at the Magallanes Interchange to the South Luzon Expressway heading south (follow the signs leading to Alabang, not Manila).
  2. From there, exit at Nichols Interchange and turn right at Sales Road.

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 3 by Public Transport

Commuting to NAIA Terminal 3 is possible via jeep or bus. Wherever you’re coming from, just take a jeep that will take you to Nichols/Terminal 3 or the shuttle bus to NAIA 3. 

If you’re coming from Makati, Mandaluyong, or Pasig, board a bus at EDSA that will pass through Airport Road. You’ll then have to take a jeep or taxi to Nichols and then to NAIA 3. 

Related reading: P2P Schedules from Provinces to Metro Manila and Back

NAIA Terminal 4

NAIA terminals - terminal 4

Known as the old domestic terminal, NAIA Terminal 4 is the oldest among all NAIA terminals. Terminal 4 was built in 1948 with only 26 check-in counters and was previously called Manila Domestic Passenger Terminal. It was also made with only one level, a few shops, and no jet bridges that passengers need to walk to and from the aircraft. 

Serviced Carriers

As of March 28, 2022, some local carriers have already transferred their operations to NAIA Terminal 4.[4] To date, Cebgo has 14 flights daily, AirAsia has 11, and AirSWIFT Airlines has three, paving the way for an anticipated 1.5 million passengers to be accommodated at Terminal 4 in 2022.[5] The following are some of the carriers serviced at Terminal 4:

  • AirAsia Zest (all other flights)
  • Fil-Asian Airways
  • Philippines AirAsia
  • AirSWIFT Airlines
  • Cebgo
  • SkyJet
  • Sky Pasada
  • Tigerair Philippines

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 4 by Car

  1. Go south on EDSA to Pasay, then turn left at the interchange between EDSA and Aurora Boulevard.
  2. From Aurora Boulevard, turn right into Andrews Avenue.
  3. And then from Andrews Avenue, turn left at the Domestic Road roundabout. Terminal 4 will be on your left side.

How to Get to NAIA Terminal 4 by Public Transport:

NAIA Terminal 4 can be accessed via public transport. And for the commute to be much easier, take note of the following:

  • Nearest train stations are Taft Avenue MRT, EDSA PNR, and Baclaran LRT. 
  • Bus stations near Terminal 4 can be found at Andrews Avenue in Pasay, Airport Road or Domestic Road, and Quirino Avenue in Paranaque. 
  • Some bus routes that will take you to Terminal 4 include Baclaran-Moonwalk via Quirino, Baclaran-Nichols and Alabang-Baclaran via Ninoy Aquino, Baclaran-Zapote-Bacoor, Almanza-Baclaran, Baclaran-Sucat, and Dasmarinas Resettlement Area-Baclaran via Coastal Road. 

Read more: A Commuter’s Guide to LRT-1 Stations

Final Thoughts

Metro Manila roads are starting to get crowded with vehicles and commuters again just like it was before COVID-19. If you’re flying out anytime soon, learning how to quickly get to NAIA Terminals will save you time and money. Make sure to check P2P buses to NAIA as well for a more convenient way to commute there.

Don’t miss the chance to explore the wonders of your destination―know the fastest way to get to NAIA and never be late for a flight again!  

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